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dc.contributor.author Gábor, Krisztina
dc.contributor.author Schermann G
dc.contributor.author Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya
dc.contributor.author Rárosi, Ferenc
dc.contributor.author Erdélyi, Dániel
dc.contributor.author Börcsökné Endreffy, Emőke
dc.contributor.author Berek K
dc.contributor.author Bartyik K
dc.contributor.author Bereczki, Csaba
dc.contributor.author Szalai, Csaba
dc.contributor.author Semsei, Ágnes F
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-23T08:56:01Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-23T08:56:01Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier 84923147996
dc.identifier.citation pagination=622-628; journalVolume=62; journalIssueNumber=4; journalTitle=PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER;
dc.identifier.uri http://repo.lib.semmelweis.hu//handle/123456789/2854
dc.identifier.uri doi:10.1002/pbc.25379
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Cytarabine (cytosine arabinoside, ara-C) is a chemotherapeutical agent used in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Adverse drug reactions, such as interpatient variability in sensitivity to ara-C, are considerable and may cause difficulties during chemotherapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can play a significant role in modifying nucleoside-drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and thus the development of adverse effects. Our aim was to determine whether polymorphisms in genes encoding transporters and enzymes responsible for the metabolism of ara-C are associated with toxicity and clinical outcome in a patient population with childhood ALL. PROCEDURE: We studied 8 SNPs in the CDA, DCK, DCTD, SLC28A3, and SLC29A1 genes in 144 patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to ALLIC BFM 1990, 1995 and 2002 protocols. RESULTS: DCK rs12648166 and DCK rs4694362 SNPs were associated with hematologic toxicity (OR = 2.63, CI 95% = 1.37-5.04, P = 0.0036 and OR = 2.53, CI 95% = 1.34-4.80, P = 0.0044, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that DCK polymorphisms might be important genetic risk factors for hematologic toxicity during ALL treatment with ara-C. Individualized chemotherapy based on genetic profiling may help to optimize ara-C dosing, leading to improvements in clinical outcome and reduced toxicity. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014;9999:1-7(c) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartof urn:issn:1545-5009
dc.title Impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms of cytarabine metabolic genes on drug toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2015-11-27T13:10:12Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.identifier.mtmt 2807591
dc.identifier.wos 000349985300014
dc.identifier.pubmed 25557962
dc.contributor.department SE/AOK/I/Genetikai, Sejt- és Immunbiológiai Intézet
dc.contributor.department SE/AOK/K/II. Sz. Gyermekgyógyászati Klinika
dc.contributor.institution Semmelweis Egyetem


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